Art Deco Favourites

Hucknall Cinemas

At present Hucknall no longer has a functioning cinema. It has a structure which was built as a cinema but is currently barely surviving as a Bingo Hall on the ground floor.

But once there were two ...........

THE BYRON CINEMA

Byron Cinema Bingo sign

It was purpose built in 1936 and the architect was local specialist Alfred J Thraves. The picture house was named after the world famous and infamous but august Lord Byron!

(Photograph of the Byron Bingo column courtesy of G Barr)

Wiki entry here

THE SCALA CINEMA

Scala Cinela front entrance

The Scala was a much earlier picture palace despite its more obvious Streamline Moderne frontage. It is known that the cinema was renamed in 1914 and temporarily closed in 1930 for 'sound' to be installed. It is likely theowners took advantage of the closure to modernised the front at around the same time.

Despite its superior external architectural design the Scala was demolished and disappeared from the Hucknall landscape in 2008.

(Image of the Scala courtesy of postcard reproduced in the Hucknall Dispatch)

Happy Days with Hopalong Cassidy

NOSTALGIA raised a lump in my throat the other day as I saw the last wall of the old Scala Cinema on Annesley Road in Hucknall crash to the ground under the tracks of a giant bulldozer.

I remembered, so vividly, what a great part this old building had played in my childhood years.

My mind flashed back to those poverty-stricken, albeit happy, years of the 1930s when my hard-earned twopence spending-money, clutched in an excited, sweaty little hand, was handed over at the Scala's Saturday 'Twopenny Rush' film show.

My chums and I cheered the heroes and booed the villains in the exciting cowboy-and-Indian pictures. And I remember when Hopalong Cassidy was quicker on the draw than the villains and his old sidekick, Gabby Hayes, who could drown beetles from his baccy-chewing jaws.

Tom Mix was another boyhood cowboy hero who, no doubt, taught us kids right from wrong with his clean living and honest roles. It was a time when good always defeated evil and was an object lesson for us all to follow.

I hope there are still some other Dispatch readers who remember those happy childhood days, which I shall always remember with affection. I felt I had to make some comment over the Scala's passing.

MR W.Teece, Greenwood Avenue, Hucknall

A campaign, to restore the Byron as a cinema, by local enthusiasts 'The Byron Community Project' has begun.

FB pages here and website here

MV Kalakala

RV Kalakala

The MV Kalakala in full steam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why Art Deco?

Why not? The imagery and innovative style of the period really appeals to me!

New Year Clock Art Deco Style

What nicer way to greet someone in the New Year or to this page? - Welcome

Spider Web Perfume Bottle Czech origins

Spiders Web Perfume Bottle by Heinrich Hoffman - Czech origins - who wouldn't want one to grace their home?

There's something about the shapes used during this period that really appeals and the use of eau-de-nil complemented in a range of colours in the pink and purple domain makes it the perfect combination for me.

Floral Art Deco Design compining greens and purples

I actually found this page on my web-site by doing a search on something completely different - that was a little spooky I have to say but I'm glad I came across it because I found a spelling error which I have now rectified!

Paris - 1937 Exposition

Expo Collage Getty

International Exhibition, May to November', 1937. From The Sphere - Coronation Record Number. (The Sphere, London, 1937). © Getty Images

The GB Pavilion showcased the work of Oliver Hill and his team of the two Erics Gill and Ravilious and Marion Dorn with whom he had collaborated with on the Midland Hotel and other projects. Eric Gill created the font type for the London Underground and Ravilious interest in tennis made the sport so prominent in the pavilion created for the Paris 1937 Expo. All Pavilions are featured in the Section Etrangéres programme here

Posters

Transport Poster Bright Hours

London Transport produced some remarkable artwork during the 1930s - this is a particularly interesting example, designed in 1931 by an unknown american artist. It advocates travelling on the underground during the 'Bright Hours'. The poster was recently sold at auction for £14,400.00.

Poster claiming underground train every 90 seconds

This London Transport poster was designed by Abram Games in 1937. London Transport's logo appeared not only on signs and leaflets, but also in many creative publicity poster designs.

London Underground

With thanks - of course to Eric Gill

Gill's Sketch for what would become the London Underground Logo remaining unchanged and being globally instantly recognisable

And some background history relating to the Underground sign

Mornington Crescent Tube Sign

A lovely example of the finished product - underground station is opposite the Black Cat Factory

The Coronation Scot, Silver Jubilee and Mallard

As I was searching transport details I found The Coronation Scot. I didn't know this existed although I have always been a big fan of the shiny blue Mallard. Thanks to the National Railway Museum Blog for an excellent insight. As with London Transport all the train artwork is so inviting!

The Coronation Scot TrainThe Silver Jubilee TrainThe Mallard Train

From l to r images of The Coronation Scot, Silver Jubilee and the Mallard trains

Kalakala (The Flying Bird) 1934-2015

The Kalakala Publicity Poster

The world's first streamlined vessel - now another icon lost forever!

A comprehensive history can be found on a dedicated web-site here and promotional postcards here dedicated page here

The Orient Express Renaissance

Modern Poster for the orient express

Keeping the luxury alive in this modern poster for the revitalised Orient Express

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Page refreshed : 1st May 2017